Now that you’ve learned how to get your stance right, where your bridge hand should be, how to grip the cue, and what bridges you should use, it’s time to take a shot. In this episode, Anthony teaches you the elements of a good pool stroke.

Transcription

Hello, I’m Master Instructor Anthony Beeler and today I want to talk to you about the elements of a good pool stroke. There’s the set, pause, finish, and then the freeze. So we’re gonna look at each of those elements individually and see what you can do with those to help improve your pool game.

Whenever you get down to the shot here, the first thing you’re gonna do is take a few practice strokes and then you’re gonna come to a complete stop. This is called the set. During the set you’ll count to three: 1, 2, 3. Pull back to the bottom of your ferrule, and then you’ll stop again. This is called the pause. The pause allows for a smooth transition between the backswing and the forward swing. So during the pause you’ll count to two: 1, 2.

Then, the last part of the stroke is called the finish/freeze. And that’s when you’re actually gonna shoot the shot, and then stay down for a four count. So this is what that looks like: 1, 2, 3, 4.

Whenever we practice something, we exaggerate it. So, in other words, when I count to three during practice, during a real game it’s going to be – more or less – a second and a half. During the pause, when we count to two, during a real game that’s going to be roughly a second. And during the freeze portion of the stroke, which is a four count, during actual play that should be roughly a two count.

Set allows your eyes to focus on the target from a still position. The pause allows for a smooth transition from the back swing to the forward swing. And then the freeze forces you to stay down on each shot and follow through. Practice these elements, and I think it will enhance your ability to pocket balls more consistently.

The post Anthony Beeler Instructional Lesson #5: Stroke appeared first on McDermott Cue Blog.

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